Wednesday, December 28

The Growing Charm of Dada


Francis Picabia, The Lovers (After the Rain), 1925
"During World War I, Zurich, the largest city in neutral Switzerland, was a refuge for artists, writers, intellectuals, pacifists, and dodgers of military service from various countries. A handful of these decided in 1916 to create a new kind of evening entertainment. They called it Cabaret Voltaire and established it at Spiegelgasse 1, not far from the room that was occupied by an occasional visitor to the cabaret, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin. The group, which became known as Dadaists, consisted of three Germans (Hugo Ball, Richard Huelsenbeck, Emmy Hennings), one Alsatian (Hans Arp), two Romanians (Marcel Janco and Tristan Tzara), and the Swiss Sophie Taeuber. They were soon joined by Walter Serner, an Austrian born in Bohemia. The youngest, Tzara, was twenty; Hennings was the oldest at thirty-one. All were united in their loathing of the war. ..."
NYBooks
Open Culture: Hear the Experimental Music of the Dada Movement: Avant-Garde Sounds from a Century Ago (Video)
From Revolutionary to Normative: A Secret History of Dada and Surrealism in American Music
UbuWeb: Dada for Now (Video)

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